Evergreen's Wild West Fest treats attendees to music, food and a mechanical bull

Deb Hurley Brobst
dbrobst@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 9/21/21

People came to Wild West Fest on Saturday for a variety of reasons. They wanted to know about host Mount Evans Home Health Care & Hospice. In the past, they took advantage of counseling and …

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Evergreen's Wild West Fest treats attendees to music, food and a mechanical bull

Posted

People came to Wild West Fest on Saturday for a variety of reasons.

They wanted to know about host Mount Evans Home Health Care & Hospice. In the past, they took advantage of counseling and rehabilitation services. They had a loved one who had been in hospice care. Or they wanted a free barbecue lunch catered by Campfire Evergreen or to ride the mechanical bull.

No matter what the reason, attendees enjoyed their time at the festival that celebrated Mount Evans’ 40th anniversary.

“The community is so supportive of Mount Evans,” said Keri Jaeger, the nonprofit’s president. “This is an event for community awareness and celebration.”

With guitarist Dean Hines performing country music in the background, Evergreen resident Kathy Jones said Mount Evans has been in her life for 31 years. She has volunteered for the organization, and it helped with her rehabilitation for two knee-replacement surgeries.

“I’ll be old someday,” Jones quipped, “and I will probably need some help.”

Jaeger responded: “We’ll be here.”

Rachel Baer Henderson of Rachel’s Creations painted flowers on Mount Evans receptionist Debbie Schwartz’ face. Henderson said Mount Evans was special to her because she found the grief counseling she needed after her husband died.

“That eight-week grief group is why I’m here,” she said. “They helped me work through my grief and made me realize I still had a life to live.”

Schwartz talked about the Mount Evans’ great programs including Camp Comfort, a camp for grieving children. Schwartz sees all kinds of people walking through the door.

“The hardest thing is for people to walk in,” she said. “Once they do, they realize there are caring people here.”

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